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« Let's not forget | Main | The sad thing is that the irony of it will be lost »

Monday, May 30, 2011

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» "We lose our ability to say that this is important, this is unimportant" from Wizbang
Nicholas Carr is known for the essay positing that Google is making us all stupid. If you haven't read it, I think you should. Just the opening paragraphs resonate: "Dave,... [Read More]

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Leslie

Home run post, Rick.

Brutally Honest continues to be a treasured source on my information trapline after way back when I googled Terri Schiavo and found one of your posts.

The distraction issue you mention is a big one for me and I think I might go out and get a copy of that book.

Rick

Thank you Leslie... I'm honored by your presence and loyalty...

Patricia

A greatly-needed article - thank you so much, Rick. A number of years ago one of our sons was a teacher and he was becoming increasingly concerned about students' lack of ability to concentrate. He confided that he himself was becoming more and more annoyed at TV and Internet, and the irritating pulsations of ads, in particular. He predicted that eventually the kids would simply be unable to hold a thought!
It's just a thought - rather profound, I think!
Again, thanks so much, Rick, for ALL your writings.

Rick

Thank you Patricia for regularly stopping by...

tim aka The Godless Heathen

Too much of a good thing. We are both fortunate and unfortunate do be living at this time. While we reap all the benefits of the new era of technology but we must also learn to adapt it into our lives responsibly.

I believe those of us who are older, who remember a simpler life, who know what it’s like without the technology, will actually have an easier time adapting to it all.

While the younger generation who nothing but all the techy lifestyle will end up learning some hard lessons. And maybe not learning to deal with it responsibly.

And what are the implications of that? A dumber population, more susceptible to be easily swayed to a certain way of thinking because we can’t be bothered to research something that takes more than two minutes to read? Are we witnessing that now?

Wouldn’t be ironic that one of Man’s greatest achievement ends up being his downfall?

Quick related story from this past weekend, the next door neighbor down at the lake had some friends over and one of them was a young man, mid twenties, who played guitar. We were hanging around the fire and he was paying his guitar. Only he didn’t know any music or songs by heart. He used a laptop with some program/website that had all the music and words to the songs. And I thought that was really pathetic and sad that he couldn’t sing one song, not one, without that damn laptop in front of him, he hadn’t taken the time to memorize one song. Hell, I was singing along, but I didn’t need to look at the computer for the words.

Lastly, (though by now who’s even stayed with me?) a few things I do to get “away from it”;

I rarely use my cell phone (just turn it off, you’ll be surprised how easy it is).

I’ve taken up fishing and hunting and grow a veggy garden, things that don’t require technology.

I make a point to communicate, debate, have some dialogue about serious events/matters/subjects with friends or family to work the brain by interacting face to face with adults and using the ole vocabulary.

I totally disconnect and disengage from the internet on the weekends and get back to “reality”.

Good post, Rick, and one that we all should refer to back often and also pass along.

Tim Chesterton

I've read that book and would rate it very highly indeed.

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